Wednesday, August 20, 2014

youngblackandvegan:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

The charges against Shanesha Taylor has been dropped!! Taylor was arrested back in march for leaving her children in the car during a job interview. This morning a deal was reached, the deal will require Taylor to complete parenting and substance abuse classes as well a establishing an education and childcare trust fund for her three kids. With each education trust fund to have $10,000 in. The money will come the fundraisers that was set up on Taylor’s behalf to help with legal fees and other expenses. A total of $144,775 was raised. $144,775 from over four thousand donors.

By entering into this agreement and program, Taylor avoided a potential two year probation or a possible eight year sentence. 

If Taylor fails to follow the conditions of the agreement, the criminal charges will be reinstated. 

amazing

dragonheartedrabbit:

Going on right now in Ferguson: Police are raiding a church that has been stocked with medical supplies, food, and tear gas recovery kits for community members engaging in protests. This cannot be allowed to continue.

Stand up, speak out. 

thepeoplesrecord:

7 black women to follow for updates in #Ferguson
August 18, 2014

Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram

2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website

3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter

4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter

5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram

6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter

7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source

for-southendgirls said: Hi, I wasn't sure who to ask about this, but you seem like a person who knows what's what. I wanted to know if you knew any rebuttals to the "Everyone for abortion has been born." argument? It's common enough to come up when talking to anti-choicers about 99.9% of the time and I can't find evidence of it being addressed anywhere. Thanks!

Haha, yes, I do have a response for that! I say, “Everyone *against* abortion has also already been born. Everyone with an opinion has already been born. It’s almost like being born is a precursor to being a fully formed human being with rights and opinions or something.”

coolchicksfromhistory:

Merit-Ptah circa 2700 BCE
Art by J Bea Young (twitter, tumblr)
Merit-Ptah is the first woman known by name in the history of science.  Little is known of her life, but according to the tomb her son created for her in Egypt, Merit-Ptah was “the chief physician.”
A handful of physicians are known by name from this early period and there is some debate over the exact timeline.  Merit-Ptah’s life likely overlapped with that Imhotep, the man most often considered the first named physician in history.  Another male physician, Hesy-Ra, is believed to have lived at around the same time as Merit-Ptah and Imhotep.  Peseshet is sometimes named as the first female physician, but she is likely at least a generation younger than Merit-Ptah, Imhotep, and Hesy-Ra. 
Peseshet was referred to as the “lady overseer of the female physicians” during the Fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt.  This shows there were a number of female medical professionals working in Egypt 4,600 years ago.  Peseshet is believed to have been involved in gynecological and obstetrical training at the ancient Egyptian medical school at Sais.  An inscription at Sais gives insight to the training of early medical practitioners: "I have come from the medical school at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman’s school at Sais where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure disease.”

coolchicksfromhistory:

Merit-Ptah circa 2700 BCE

Art by J Bea Young (twitter, tumblr)

Merit-Ptah is the first woman known by name in the history of science.  Little is known of her life, but according to the tomb her son created for her in Egypt, Merit-Ptah was “the chief physician.”

A handful of physicians are known by name from this early period and there is some debate over the exact timeline.  Merit-Ptah’s life likely overlapped with that Imhotep, the man most often considered the first named physician in history.  Another male physician, Hesy-Ra, is believed to have lived at around the same time as Merit-Ptah and Imhotep.  Peseshet is sometimes named as the first female physician, but she is likely at least a generation younger than Merit-Ptah, Imhotep, and Hesy-Ra. 

Peseshet was referred to as the “lady overseer of the female physicians” during the Fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt.  This shows there were a number of female medical professionals working in Egypt 4,600 years ago.  Peseshet is believed to have been involved in gynecological and obstetrical training at the ancient Egyptian medical school at Sais.  An inscription at Sais gives insight to the training of early medical practitioners: "I have come from the medical school at Heliopolis, and have studied at the woman’s school at Sais where the divine mothers have taught me how to cure disease.”

baltimoresun:

"Hands up, don’t shoot" has become one of the primary rallying cries for those in Ferguson, Mo., protesting the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown last week.
The slogan has now spread to Baltimore, with a two part mural on the boarded-up back of a liquor store at the corner of East Preston Street and Greenmount Avenue. “Hands up” is on one level of the building, while a shadowy figure with arms raised is on a lower level.

baltimoresun:

"Hands up, don’t shoot" has become one of the primary rallying cries for those in Ferguson, Mo., protesting the police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown last week.

The slogan has now spread to Baltimore, with a two part mural on the boarded-up back of a liquor store at the corner of East Preston Street and Greenmount Avenue. “Hands up” is on one level of the building, while a shadowy figure with arms raised is on a lower level.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
thepeoplesrecord:

Another Black Youth Gunned Down: The Shooting of Darius SimmonsPictured - Patricia Larry with a photo of her son, Darius.June 6, 2012Darius Simmons was like a lot of 13-year-old boys — funny, boisterous and a little braggy…
John Henry Spooner, his 75-year-old next-door neighbor, is charged with first-degree murder in the boy’s death. Spooner, a widower who has been diagnosed with cancer, had complained to Alderman Bob Donovan about a break-in at his home earlier in the week, blaming the family next door. 

Spooner admitted to police that he shot Darius on Thursday morning, even as the boy had held up his arms and ran away.
Spooner shot the boy because he believed he’d broken into his house and stolen some guns. (Spooner was a collector.) Simmons’ mother says the police searched the house and found nothing. I understand why she wants to say that, but I think even if her son actually was burglar you are still left with 1.) someone taking the law for self and 2.) executing a child over an alleged theft.

There may well be more here. We’ll likely know in the coming days. I bet we’ll be hearing about Wisconsin’s own stand your ground law. For now we have this:


Milwaukee police said they recognized the area around 19th and Arrow streets address when the call came in about a man they said shot his teenage neighbor. Dispatch records obtained by WISN 12 News show the Spooner called 911 at least 15 times in five years, including four stolen guns after a break-in Tuesday. 

 An hour before the shooting, Spooner had been eating breakfast with Alderman Bob Donovan. “(Spooner) was telling me about the recent burglary that he had. They stole $3,000 worth of guns. I know John to have been a member, or is a member, of the National Rifle Association,” Donovan said. 

"I asked him, ‘Did you call the police?’ He said, ‘Yeah,’ but for whatever reason, seemed a little frustrated with that investigation. I don’t know the details of it," Donovan said. 

"Did he suspect the 13-year-old?" Lyles asked. 

"He suspects whoever lives next door to him, that those individuals were involved," Donovan said. 

Donovan said Spooner has lung cancer and seemed troubled, not angry. But after the shooting, he said the conversation stands out. 

"He did say that ‘maybe there are other ways of dealing with this,’" Donovan said.
 
Source

Update: Spooner shot Simmons with a 9mm handgun five feet away from him in the chest, in front of his mother.  

Darius was shot once in the chest with his hands raised.  He ran to escape and collapsed at the corner, while Spooner attempted to shoot him in the back, and tried to fire a third shot.  
After police arrived, Darius’s body remained on the sidewalk, while police questioned his mother, Patricia Larry, in a squad car for approximately two hours.
During the police investigation of the shooting, they searched Ms. Larry’s home again.  Finding nothing, they then proceeded to arrest his older brother for having truancy tickets.

thepeoplesrecord:

Another Black Youth Gunned Down: The Shooting of Darius Simmons
Pictured - Patricia Larry with a photo of her son, Darius.
June 6, 2012

Darius Simmons was like a lot of 13-year-old boys — funny, boisterous and a little braggy…

John Henry Spooner, his 75-year-old next-door neighbor, is charged with first-degree murder in the boy’s death. Spooner, a widower who has been diagnosed with cancer, had complained to Alderman Bob Donovan about a break-in at his home earlier in the week, blaming the family next door. 

Spooner admitted to police that he shot Darius on Thursday morning, even as the boy had held up his arms and ran away.
Spooner shot the boy because he believed he’d broken into his house and stolen some guns. (Spooner was a collector.) Simmons’ mother says the police searched the house and found nothing. I understand why she wants to say that, but I think even if her son actually was burglar you are still left with 1.) someone taking the law for self and 2.) executing a child over an alleged theft.
There may well be more here. We’ll likely know in the coming days. I bet we’ll be hearing about Wisconsin’s own stand your ground law. For now we have this:
Milwaukee police said they recognized the area around 19th and Arrow streets address when the call came in about a man they said shot his teenage neighbor. Dispatch records obtained by WISN 12 News show the Spooner called 911 at least 15 times in five years, including four stolen guns after a break-in Tuesday. 
 An hour before the shooting, Spooner had been eating breakfast with Alderman Bob Donovan. “(Spooner) was telling me about the recent burglary that he had. They stole $3,000 worth of guns. I know John to have been a member, or is a member, of the National Rifle Association,” Donovan said. 
"I asked him, ‘Did you call the police?’ He said, ‘Yeah,’ but for whatever reason, seemed a little frustrated with that investigation. I don’t know the details of it," Donovan said. 
"Did he suspect the 13-year-old?" Lyles asked. 
"He suspects whoever lives next door to him, that those individuals were involved," Donovan said. 
Donovan said Spooner has lung cancer and seemed troubled, not angry. But after the shooting, he said the conversation stands out. 
"He did say that ‘maybe there are other ways of dealing with this,’" Donovan said.
 
Update: Spooner shot Simmons with a 9mm handgun five feet away from him in the chest, in front of his mother. 

Darius was shot once in the chest with his hands raised.  He ran to escape and collapsed at the corner, while Spooner attempted to shoot him in the back, and tried to fire a third shot. 

After police arrived, Darius’s body remained on the sidewalk, while police questioned his mother, Patricia Larry, in a squad car for approximately two hours.

During the police investigation of the shooting, they searched Ms. Larry’s home again.  Finding nothing, they then proceeded to arrest his older brother for having truancy tickets.